Halim El-Dabh

Composer
Egyptian/American, 1921-

Halim Abdul Messieh El-Dabh (Arabic: حليم عبد المسيح الضبع‎ (Ḥalīm ʻAbd al-Masīḥ al-Ḍabʻ); born March 4, 1921) is an Egyptian-born American composer, performer, ethnomusicologist, and educator, who has had a career spanning six decades. He is particularly known as an early pioneer of electronic music, for having composed in 1944 the first piece of electronic tape music, specifically an electroacoustic musique concrète piece, and later for his influential work at the Columbia–Princeton Electronic Music Center from the late 1950s to early 1960s. (from Wikipedia)

Selected works by Halim El-Dabh:
“Once when father (George Ives) was asked: 'How can you stand it to hear old John Bell (who was the best stonemason in town) bellow off-key the way he does at camp-meetings?' his answer was: 'Old John is a supreme musician. Look into his face and hear the music of the ages. Don't pay too much attention to the sounds. If you do, you may miss the music. You won't get a heroic ride to Heaven on pretty little sounds!'”
--Charles Ives